Quantcast

Jump to content

Chat


Photo
- - - - -

The 'Lemon Clot' Essay


  • Please log in to reply
60 replies to this topic

#21 mom2cutie

mom2cutie

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 529 posts

Posted 19 February 2011 - 09:53 AM

Everyone should send this to their MIL prior to giving birth.

#22 mom2cutie

mom2cutie

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 529 posts

Posted 19 February 2011 - 09:53 AM

Everyone should send this to their MIL prior to giving birth.

#23 strawberries

strawberries

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 150 posts

Posted 19 February 2011 - 10:05 AM

I think the mil knows what the dil is experiencing. She had your husband.

#24 mom2cutie

mom2cutie

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 529 posts

Posted 19 February 2011 - 10:35 AM

Hmmmmmmm, my MIL had "forgotten".

#25 MashedPotatoMP

MashedPotatoMP

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 77 posts

Posted 19 February 2011 - 10:44 AM

It was bumped because Sharon1964, the author of the essay, had found it posted here and was asking that it be credited to her when it is reposted. If you look at the first 2011 comment, you can see what she wrote.

#26 firefly1970

firefly1970

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 448 posts

Posted 19 February 2011 - 11:25 AM

My midwife actually specifically stated not to worry unless clots were bigger than lemon sized. This was before I read this essay, and I'm fairly sure she never saw it since she wasn't very internet-savvy at the time. I think lemon sized clot is some sort of industry standard comparison, because the first time I read this I remember thinking "hey, that's just what the midwife said!"

#27 SadMil

SadMil

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 44 posts

Posted 19 February 2011 - 11:26 AM

People bump up interesting or relevant posts. This post is old, but is a must have for all MsIL. Just because something is old does not make it less interesting or less relevant to each of us. I bumped up my own post this week. It was from a few months ago.

#28 strawberries

strawberries

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 150 posts

Posted 19 February 2011 - 05:37 PM

"It was bumped because Sharon1964, the author of the essay, had found it posted here and was asking that it be credited to her when it is reposted. If you look at the first 2011 comment, you can see what she wrote." Read more: http://www.grandpare...l#ixzz1ERkzxZjW I can understand a few months ago but a year and a half? Who has that kind of time to look that far back? Wow. Lemon size is still pretty good size for a blood clot. I definitely would be having that one checked if it happened to me. Big difference between a midwife and an OB-GYN MD. I've worked with both and there is no comparison.

#29 firefly1970

firefly1970

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 448 posts

Posted 19 February 2011 - 06:05 PM

I completely agree about the difference in experience - the average midwife has attended far more vaginal births, and provided post-natal care for the same than an OB-GYN.

#30 firefly1970

firefly1970

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 448 posts

Posted 19 February 2011 - 06:09 PM

Mayo Clinic uses a golf ball as the max size. http://www.mayoclini...um-care/PR00142 This OB also uses the lemon comparison. http://www.fisher-pr...&content=114672 Feel free to Google - there's lots of references to world-wide sources saying call if the clot is bigger than a lemon.

#31 strawberries

strawberries

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 150 posts

Posted 19 February 2011 - 06:49 PM

How can I argue with a google search? Silly me. After you have worked with both for several years then we will compare real life experiences.

#32 Postscript

Postscript

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 179 posts

Posted 19 February 2011 - 07:33 PM

You are right there is no comparison, having given birth using both because of complications, I was glad that I had my midwife there. Midwives are advocates for the patient far more so than an OBGYN in my opinion. When the OBGYN decided I needed an emergency c/s the midwife made him come back to me and explain how it would impact future births. To tell the truth I was at a point where I would have agreed to selling my first born just to stop the unending pain because I'd been in full blown pushing labour for hours with no result, ds was lodged in my pelvic region and while the midwife knew a c/s was the likely outcome, she still thought I should know all the ramifications and as my baby was not in distress there was the option of allowing me to continue, if I'd wanted to. The OBGYN rolled his eyes and told me in the most patronizing exasperated manner. A shameful way to treat another medical professional. But I find most specialists (and I've had a lot to do with them, particularly Orthopods) to be patronizing, aggressive and too egotistical to deal with patients concerns. My Orthopedic surgeon may well have been one of the best in the country, but I heard him yell at a pensioner and tell her she was being "stupid" because she asked questions. Now Orthopods are not OBGYNs but the dealings I had with them, are similar.

#33 strawberries

strawberries

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 150 posts

Posted 19 February 2011 - 08:36 PM

"unending pain because I'd been in full blown pushing labour for hours with no result, ds was lodged in my pelvic region and while the midwife knew a c/s was the likely outcome" Read more: http://www.grandpare...l#ixzz1ESSzhZqQ My point exactly. Thanks for clarifying what OB-GYNs know and midwives don't. Only by the grace of God and a knowledgable MD, your baby didn't suffer any consequences of being lodged in there for so long. If that's what being a patient advocate means, no thanks, I'll opt for the safety of my baby.

#34 Guest__*

Guest__*
  • Guests

Posted 19 February 2011 - 08:46 PM

It's been my experience that most doctors that are worth their salt are prima donnas. I think it goes along with having confidence in their abilities. If they second guess themselves they are not able to make necessary decisions. I personally don't care what their bedside manner is as long as they do their job properly.

#35 Postscript

Postscript

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 179 posts

Posted 19 February 2011 - 10:53 PM

My point exactly. Thanks for clarifying what OB-GYNs know and midwives don't. Only by the grace of God and a knowledgable MD, your baby didn't suffer any consequences of being lodged in there for so long. Read more: http://www.grandpare...l#ixzz1ET23OZ7X Actually I proved nothing of the sort. It was at the insistence of the midwife that the doctor do an internal, he just wanted to give me more drugs and insisted I wasn't pushing hard enough. Once he did the internal, he knew what the midwife already did and had been telling him for some time. But then it was the midwife who spent all her time with me, instead of treating me like a moron. Just because one has a lot of knowledge and spent years at University and Med school, doesn't entitle one to be an arrogant sod to his patients. I get their time is precious, God knows I'm paying for it through the nose! I know that doctors aren't nurses, they don't do the hand holding or the dirty jobs that come with patients and disease etc, you'd think seeing as they don't spend half their lives fetching and carrying bedpans, they could afford a little kindness and seeing as we pay for them, they could at least pretend they are listening to our concerns, after all who knows our bodies best?

#36 parsleythelion

parsleythelion

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 933 posts

Posted 20 February 2011 - 11:15 AM

From my personal experience, this essay now feels slightly dramatic. However, it was a brilliant tool to use when trying to educate my husband on what could happen and why I only wanted people I was completely comfortable with until after I had recovered and had got used to my new baby. The graphic detail helps men understand what is otherwise an incomprehensible and emotionally loaded subject for them. DH wanted our mothers to come and stay for weeks, if not months after the birth (I think he suggested my mother coming for the first week and his mother coming for a whole month after that - to "share the joy" or some other such nonesense) taking cue from a friend and his wife whose mothers live much further from them and had them over to "help" for months after they had their baby. I told him if they came, they would be trying to muscle in and push him - and perhpas me - out. I said that I wanted him to be completely comfortable with baby before our parents came to visit for any extended length of time. Sure enough, when MIL came to visit (6 weeks after the birth for 1 week), she snatched the baby and started criticising every little thing DH did with baby, trying to "help" us with her superior mothering skills... Difference being that he was confident in what he was doing and could therefore stand up to her without feeling like he didn't know how to care for his own child. The friends who had their mothers over to help are still nervous about dealing with their own child. He won't sleep easily at night when one of the GMas aren't there to calm him and they seem to be having a hard time on their own now. I feel sorry for them and don't want to tell DH "I told you so", but, well...

#37 parsleythelion

parsleythelion

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 933 posts

Posted 20 February 2011 - 11:18 AM

I want to qualify that by saying it's useful to have grandmas there to ask advice if you need any, but not to movet hem in to take over - in my experience, it knocks your own confidence in your ability to care for your child.

#38 strawberries

strawberries

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 150 posts

Posted 20 February 2011 - 11:25 AM

Excuse me, I guess I misread your post. I took your wording to be just the opposite of what you now describe as happening. My mistake. I do know from real life experiences, not googling, I would 100 percent rather have an OB-GYN than a mid-wife.

#39 firefly1970

firefly1970

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 448 posts

Posted 20 February 2011 - 12:36 PM

:::Shrugs::: My experiences taught me the opposite for low-risk pregnancies. The googling wasn't to debate midwives vs. OBs, but to show that OBs and the Mayo Clinic (which I thought would be a pretty reputable link) use the lemon clot as a rule of thumb for max size of clot.

#40 Memame

Memame

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 941 posts

Posted 20 February 2011 - 01:49 PM

Should be required reading for all MILs, regardless of clot size.