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About this blog

What Every Girl Should Learn from her Dad...

Hello to those of you who have found me in the vast content of the internet (and to my family and friends who I may have begged and pleaded) to come along for the ride.  I appreciate all of you.

The image HERE  is a poem I wrote for my Dad on his 70th birthday.  In my ignorance back then, I sort of thought my Dad was getting “old”. I was still relatively “young” of course and I lacked perspective.  The last 20 years has provided more and I have certainly learned how “aging” happens in both shared ways and unique ways.

Most people who know me, know that my Dad is the shining light of my life.  A steadfast example to me and my family of what it means to be “unageable”. At nearly 90 years of age he is still mentally sharp, physically active and quite frankly leads a more active social schedule than my own. While the whole concept of “blogging” and content marketing is somewhat lost on him—he asked me if I was going to “twixt” something—that is his word for “texting” but also “tweeting”—he is still learning all the time and is connected to his family, friends and community through both  personal and technological ways.   

What he has had to do to maintain his “unageable” status is fundamentally simple though not always easy. As he is really the backbone of this whole project and a shining example of living a life that isn’t defined by his chronological age it seemed fitting that on Father’s Day, we would step forward into the public light.

The blog, the website, the Facebook page, Instagram and Twitter are all live today. We couldn’t be more excited to share grand to GREAT with the world.  We are thrilled with where we are going and the people we will help with our plans. 

It’s not easy getting older and this blog will acknowledge some of the obstacles but we’re also going to focus on how what we can do to live our best lives from 55 to 105!  And if you like what you are reading, I hope you will comment, share and come along for the ride.

Did you know?

It is predicted that by the year 2030, 70 million US citizens will be over the age of 65.  And 8.5 million people will be over the age of 85.  The “oldest old” Americans (those over the age of 85) are the fasting growing age group in the country. According to the CDC, if you live to the age of 65 you can expect to live on average another 19.3 years!   

To put that in perspective—when my parents were born (1928 and 1931) the average life expectancy in the United States for men was 59.7.  That’s right, not even 60 years of age.  

What this means is that historically we haven’t seen a lot of examples of “unageable” living.  Those who make it past 85, 90 and beyond are the outliers.  We want to know their secrets because they seem and statistically are extraordinary.   But the truth of it is, that as baby boomers and Gen “X” age, there will be huge numbers of people who survive to 85 and beyond.   

This blog and the company above it want to inspire people to take daily actions to improve their lives from 55 and beyond.  In truth, starting before 55 is not a bad idea either.  But regardless of your age, your income, your relative health—you will be successful with the grand to GREAT philosophy and strategy in place.     

Happy Father's Day!

 

Entries in this blog

grandtoGREAT

“How old would you be if you didn’t know how old you were?”–Satchel Paige

 

 

 

It’s baseball season and being in Oregon, the whole state has been focused on the Oregon State Beavers historic season and journey to win the NCAA World Series.  They just got their 26 game winning streak broken this week so it seems like a baseball theme is well-timed. 

 

I love this quote from Satchel Paige.  Satchel Paige was renowned for throwing the fast ball—an incredible fast ball—and for how long he was able to keep throwing the fast ball that hard. He pitched for more than 40 years, often year-round, himself claiming to have pitched around 2500 games with at least 50 no-hitters.  Did you know that after he retired from the MLB a few years later, he resurfaced for a swan song night with the Kansas City (Oakland) Athletics, as the named starting pitcher against the Boston Red Sox? At age 59 years, 2 months and 18 days, he became the oldest player in major league history.

 

We aren’t all destined to be major league baseball stars, like Leroy “Satchel” Paige but his example of achieving something historical at almost sixty years of age is certainly inspirational. And being an athlete, he is a great example of the first maxim of living the grand to GREAT lifestyle. 

 

 

MOVE  Every day.  

 

Whether big or small it doesn’t matter at all, but you need to MOVE, every day.

 

 

 

‘A recent Swedish study found that physical activity was the number one contributor to longevity, adding extra years to your life—even if you don’t start exercising until your senior years. But getting active is not just about adding years to your life, it’s about adding life to your years. You’ll not only look better when you exercise, you’ll feel sharper, more energetic, and experience a greater sense of well-being.

 

“Age is a question of mind over matter. If you don't mind, it doesn't matter.”- Satchel Paige

 

Starting or maintaining a regular exercise routine can be a challenge at any age—and it doesn’t get any easier as you get older. You may feel discouraged by health problems, aches and pains, or concerns about injuries or falls. If you've never exercised before, you may not know where to begin, or perhaps you think you're too old or frail, can never live up to the standards you set when you were younger. Or maybe you just think that exercise is boring.

 

While these may seem like good reasons to slow down and take it easy as you age, they're even better reasons to get moving. Becoming more active can energize your mood, relieve stress, help you manage symptoms of illness and pain, and improve your overall sense of well-being. And reaping the rewards of exercise doesn’t have to involve strenuous workouts or trips to the gym. It’s about adding more movement and activity to your life, even in small ways. No matter your age or physical condition, it’s never too late to get your body moving, boost your health and outlook, and improve how you age.’

 

 

 

There are many reasons that older adults give for not maintaining exercise habits and for getting more sedentary. Let’s look at some common excuses and see how valid they really are.

 

1)      “It doesn’t matter what I do—I’m going to get old anyway”

 

Actually regular physical activity helps you look and feel younger and stay independent longer. It also lowers your risk for a variety of conditions, including Alzheimer’s and dementia, heart disease, diabetes, certain cancers, high blood pressure, and obesity.

 

                                                      2)      “I might risk falling or getting injured”

 

Nope—not the case. Regular exercise, by building strength and stamina, prevents loss of bone mass and improves balance, actually reducing your risk of falling.

 

     3)   “I will never be able to do what I could do when I was younger."

‘Changes in hormones, metabolism, bone density, and muscle mass mean that strength and performance levels inevitably decline with age, but that doesn’t mean you can no longer derive a sense of achievement from physical activity or improve your health. The key is to set lifestyle goals that are appropriate to your age. And remember: a sedentary lifestyle takes a much greater toll on athletic ability than biological aging.’

 

                                                     4)      “I’m too old to start exercising”

 

‘You’re never too old to get moving and improve your health! In fact, adults who become active later in life often show greater physical and mental improvements than their younger counterparts.’

 

Instead of looking for reasons not to MOVE everyday.  Why not look for how you will!   

 

Along the lines of that famous slogan for Nike (Just do it)  I’ll leave you with one more quote from Satchel Paige. It’s a baseball quote, but the message applies.  Your goal isn't to throw strikes, but to live an “UNAGEABLE” life.  The goal stays the same, just like home plate—you just need to start taking actions to get there. 

“Just take the ball and throw it where you want to. Throw strikes. Home plate don't move.” Satchel Paige

 

 

 

Quoted from Helpguide.org. Written by Lawrence Robinson, Melinda Smith, M.A., and Jeanne Segal, Ph.D. Last updated: April 2017

 

Satchel Paige A's.jpg

grandtoGREAT

 

The image HERE  is a poem I wrote for my Dad on his 70th birthday.  In my ignorance back then, I sort of thought my Dad was getting “old”. I was still relatively “young” of course and I lacked perspective.  The last 20 years has provided more and I have certainly learned how “aging” happens in both shared ways and unique ways.

 

Most people who know me, know that my Dad is the shining light of my life.  A steadfast example to me and my family of what it means to be “unageable”. At nearly 90 years of age he is still mentally sharp, physically active and quite frankly leads a more active social schedule than my own. While the whole concept of “blogging” and content marketing is somewhat lost on him—he asked me if I was going to “twixt” something—that is his word for “texting” but also “tweeting”—he is still learning all the time and is connected to his family, friends and community through both  personal and technological ways.   

 

What he has had to do to maintain his “unageable” status is fundamentally simple though not always easy. As he is really the backbone of this whole project and a  vivid example of living a life that isn’t defined by his chronological age it seemed fitting that on Father’s Day, we would step forward into the public light.

 

The blog, the website, the Facebook page, Instagram and Twitter are all live today. We couldn’t be more excited to share grand to GREAT with the world.  We are thrilled with where we are going and the people we will help with our plans. 

 

It’s not easy getting older and this blog will acknowledge some of the obstacles but we’re also going to focus on how what we can do to live our best lives from 55 to 105!  And if you like what you are reading, I hope you will comment, share and come along for the ride.

 

Did you know?

 

It is predicted that by the year 2030, 70 million US citizens will be over the age of 65.  And 8.5 million people will be over the age of 85.  The “oldest old” Americans (those over the age of 85) are the fasting growing age group in the country. According to the CDC, if you live to the age of 65 you can expect to live on average another 19.3 years!   

 

To put that in perspective—when my parents were born (1928 and 1931) the average life expectancy in the United States for men was 59.7.  That’s right, not even 60 years of age.  

 

What this means is that historically we haven’t seen a lot of examples of “unageable” living.  Those who make it past 85, 90 and beyond are the outliers.  We want to know their secrets because they seem and statistically are extraordinary.   But the truth of it is, that as baby boomers and Gen “X” age, there will be huge numbers of people who survive to 85 and beyond.   

 

This blog wants to inspire people to take daily actions to improve their lives from 55 and beyond.  In truth, starting before 55 is not a bad idea either.  But regardless of your age, your income, your relative health—you will be successful with the grand to GREAT philosophy and strategy in place.     

Happy Father's Day!