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About this blog

What Every Girl Should Learn from her Dad...

Hello to those of you who have found me in the vast content of the internet (and to my family and friends who I may have begged and pleaded) to come along for the ride.  I appreciate all of you.

The image HERE  is a poem I wrote for my Dad on his 70th birthday.  In my ignorance back then, I sort of thought my Dad was getting “old”. I was still relatively “young” of course and I lacked perspective.  The last 20 years has provided more and I have certainly learned how “aging” happens in both shared ways and unique ways.

Most people who know me, know that my Dad is the shining light of my life.  A steadfast example to me and my family of what it means to be “unageable”. At nearly 90 years of age he is still mentally sharp, physically active and quite frankly leads a more active social schedule than my own. While the whole concept of “blogging” and content marketing is somewhat lost on him—he asked me if I was going to “twixt” something—that is his word for “texting” but also “tweeting”—he is still learning all the time and is connected to his family, friends and community through both  personal and technological ways.   

What he has had to do to maintain his “unageable” status is fundamentally simple though not always easy. As he is really the backbone of this whole project and a shining example of living a life that isn’t defined by his chronological age it seemed fitting that on Father’s Day, we would step forward into the public light.

The blog, the website, the Facebook page, Instagram and Twitter are all live today. We couldn’t be more excited to share grand to GREAT with the world.  We are thrilled with where we are going and the people we will help with our plans. 

It’s not easy getting older and this blog will acknowledge some of the obstacles but we’re also going to focus on how what we can do to live our best lives from 55 to 105!  And if you like what you are reading, I hope you will comment, share and come along for the ride.

Did you know?

It is predicted that by the year 2030, 70 million US citizens will be over the age of 65.  And 8.5 million people will be over the age of 85.  The “oldest old” Americans (those over the age of 85) are the fasting growing age group in the country. According to the CDC, if you live to the age of 65 you can expect to live on average another 19.3 years!   

To put that in perspective—when my parents were born (1928 and 1931) the average life expectancy in the United States for men was 59.7.  That’s right, not even 60 years of age.  

What this means is that historically we haven’t seen a lot of examples of “unageable” living.  Those who make it past 85, 90 and beyond are the outliers.  We want to know their secrets because they seem and statistically are extraordinary.   But the truth of it is, that as baby boomers and Gen “X” age, there will be huge numbers of people who survive to 85 and beyond.   

This blog and the company above it want to inspire people to take daily actions to improve their lives from 55 and beyond.  In truth, starting before 55 is not a bad idea either.  But regardless of your age, your income, your relative health—you will be successful with the grand to GREAT philosophy and strategy in place.     

Happy Father's Day!

 

Entries in this blog

grandtoGREAT

Love Only Grows by Sharing

 

 

“Love only grows by sharing. You can only have more for yourself by giving it away to others.” 
― Brian Tracy

 

Today’s blog is possibly the most important that I have written yet.  What?  If you’ve been following along then you know that I said that the first of grand to GREAT’s five daily actions—MOVE—was possibly the most important.  Now here I am with the third, SHARE, and I’m saying this blog is more important? 

Well, yes.  But only because most everyone already understands and accepts the notion that you have to keep moving as you age, or you risk a lot of health issues not to mention your happiness. Something that people don’t necessarily see as vital to their health and happiness, is the need to spend time with others.  Yet, isolation and loneliness not only negatively impact both mental and physical health in seniors, but ‘according to a study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, both social isolation and loneliness are associated with a higher risk of mortality in adults aged 52 and older.’ In a nationally representative sample of 1,604 American elders, 43% of respondents were identified as lonely. The study also proved that those who were identified as feeling lonely, died significantly earlier than those who did not experience loneliness.

As with my other posts, this is another of the things that my father has shown me "how to be"  in his own life.  He recently made a very long trip from Portland to Victoria, BC to visit his sister.  It was her 93rd birthday and she lives in an assisted living community.  When there, he went out to buy her a milkshake, which is all she asked for and they spent the time together reminiscing about their childhood days on the farm.  It wasn’t an easy trip for him, but he did it because he understands the value of sharing himself and connecting.  And as a bonus, it brought joy and sharing to another senior who valued it just as much.

 

That is why at grand to GREAT, our third daily action is:

 

SHAREif you haven’t spent time with other people, do it today.   Call your grandchildren or your children or a neighbor.  You are invaluable, so share your life with friends and other people in your community.

 

Here are some ways to share and connect:

 

  

  1.      Volunteer :  Research has shown that for older adults, volunteering can be an important mechanism for meeting new people and extending connections. While there are undoubtedly many social opportunities for older people in which they can interact, volunteering is able to provide a much broader and more diverse network of interactions than other types of social activities.Volunteers make contacts with people on a number of different levels, as they are able to make social ties with other volunteers, any clients they may serve and with the staff of host organizations for which they volunteer (Lee, 2008)

  2.           Join an Online Group:  Another wonderful innovation of the internet is the ability to connect with people literally all over the world.  And you can do it from the comfort of your own home. Facebook  is a fantastic place to connect with people and even find old friends and acquaintances.  Or try Meetup.com to find local people in your area who share your interests.  You can even start your own group on Meetup.

  3.          Join a local church:  Even if you’ve never been a regular church goer, finding a local church, synagogue or other spiritual organization near you for regular events and a sense of community.

  4.       Find interest clubs around you: Local garden clubs, golf courses, tennis clubs, and senior centers.  There are local groups in your phone book that are eager to have you join them.

  5.          Call a relative or visit your neighbor: Sometimes it is as simple as picking up the phone or walking next door.  When you are feeling lonely, even small moments can help.   And you never know, you might be providing the same benefit for whoever picks up the phone or answers the door.

Loneliness is not a “normal” part of the aging process. Instead, it is a serious indicator that something important is missing from your life. It’s ok to feel lonely occasionally.

Everyone does. But, when you feel lonely all the time, you need to take steps to get things back on track.

With the grand to GREAT lifestyle, we combat loneliness and isolation by taking easy and sustainable action every day.   

“Always find opportunities to make someone smile, and to offer random acts of kindness in everyday life.” 
― Roy T. BennettThe Light in the Heart

http://www.grandtogreatlife.com

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grandtoGREAT

 

“I’m gonna make the rest of my life, the best of my life.” Eric Thomas

 

 

Everybody has a WHY?

 

 

 

I got to spend multiple hours of one-on-one time with my father this weekend. It doesn’t happen very often any more, for a number of reasons, and it’s time that I know I savor.  I like to think he does to.  Many of our hours were spent driving, and having that time to talk about anything and everything was relished. We laughed, teased and reminisced, and we also talked about hopes and dreams, our fears and regrets and what the future was going to look like for us and the generations to follow.

 

For those of you who have been reading along on our blog, you know that my father is one of the key inspirations for Grand to GREAT’s mission. He inspires me, his family, our friends and his many acquaintances with his vigor and passion for life at almost 90 years of age.  (As a side note, the purpose of our weekend together was to attend the birthday party for another friend’s 90th birthday, and it was certainly a fantastic reminder of everything that makes the Grand to GREAT lifestyle)

 

In our conversations this weekend my Dad asked me many questions about my “new business” and what I was trying to do with it.  He thought I was writing a book (I had started to) and wasn’t sure what I planned on doing now if I wasn’t writing the book (I’m not—well not now anyway). He knew I had talked about five basic ideas but he wanted me to remind him of them and he wanted to check them off, to make sure he agreed with everything I was saying.

 

Before we got to the “WHAT” of my business, I told him he probably needed to understand the “WHY” a little better.  And I think that’s important for anyone who like me, is trying to share ideas and content with their audience. And so I shared with him the “WHY” of Grand to GREAT, and now I’m going to share it with you too.

 

Did you know On January 1, 2011, the oldest Baby Boomers turned 65?  Every day since  and for the next 19 years, about 10,000 more will cross that threshold DAILY.

By 2030, when all Baby Boomers will have turned 65, fully 18% of the nation’s population will be at least that age.

 

Never in the nation’s history has there been such rapid growth in both the“young old” and the “oldest old”.

As the US Bureau of the Census points out, “Since the oldest old often have severe chronic health problems which demand special attention, the rapid growth of this population group has many implications for individuals, families and governments.”

 

Life expectancies have continued to increase and are dramatically different from the generation ahead of the baby boomers. The average life expectancy for a 65-year-old American is 17.7 years for a male and 20.3 years for a female. That represents three to four more years of life expectancy compared to what the prior generation had at the same age. And if you are now 75, you can expect to live another 11 years if you're a man and another 13 years if you're a woman.¹

 

Healthy baby boomers are likely to live even longer. “They could live to be 95 easily,” says George Schofield, a developmental psychologist and author of “After 50 It's Up to Us.” While this longevity bonus will give boomers more time to pursue their passions and leave their mark on the world, it’s also additional years of retirement that need to be financed. “They are going to have to find a way to make their income last a lot longer than the earlier generations did,” Schofield says.²

 

The statistics are just that—statistical.  It’s easy to ignore and put off the future.  Many baby boomers are delaying retirement out of necessity and many of the highest educated boomers will continue working through their 60’s.  Due to many economic and social reason, the baby boomers perched on the front stoop of old age, are more downbeat than other age groups about the trajectory of their own lives and about the direction of the nation as a whole.³

 

Grand to GREAT’s mission is to help people live their best lives from 55 to 105.  We are here to help shift people’s mindsets and to inspire the growing population of ‘seniors’ to take daily action to live better lives.  If you truly understand that you are in control of the quality of your life, and that your life will likely extend for 20, 30 or even 40 more years—don’t you want to make those years count?

 

And so I talked to my Dad about the five daily actions again.  MOVE, LEARN, SHARE, GIVE and LET GO.

 

He ticked him off on his hand and said, yep—I do them all.

 

I said,  “Yes, Dad”—I know.

 

 

 

¹https://money.usnews.com/money/blogs/on-retirement/2014/07/22/12-baby-boomer-retirement-trends

 

²https://money.usnews.com/money/retirement/articles/2014/06/16/the-youngest-baby-boomers-turn-50

 

³ http://www.pewsocialtrends.org/2010/12/20/baby-boomers-approach-65-glumly/

 

grandtoGREAT

We must be willing to let go of the life we’ve planned, so as to have the life that is waiting for us.
Joseph Campbell

 

  What is it they say about hindsight?  That it’s 20/20?  Every year as we get older it is easier to look back on our lives with the perspective that only comes with aging.  We can see decisions we made in our teens, our 20’s and realize that in some cases they were the best thing we could have ever done. Our lives are still fuller because of the relationships we formed, and all the memories that have been created. Other choices we look back on with regret, perhaps even anger, knowing that we chose poorly. We took a path that has brought pain and suffering. It’s hard not to beat ourselves up with the “why’s” and trying to understand where we went wrong. 

But to live our best lives, we simply have to be willing to let go of those regrets and move on.  As Joseph Campbell reminds us above, we’ll never know the life that is waiting for us if we don’t.  Living your best life often means we need to let go of the past, but it can also mean we need to let go of fear.  Fear of the unknown, fear of failure, fears of loss—when we focus on these things we are restrained from living our best lives.

My mother-in-law has had a life-long fear of flying.  She literally had never flown on an airplane because of it. She’s not alone of course, but it limited her from visiting her family on the East coast, and from seeing her grandson play collegiate football. Being a former travel agent and someone who doesn’t “love” flying, I tried to entice her with free travel, bored her with safety data and even offered to take her to the doctor for tranquilizers.   After losing her husband in 2014, she started to realize that she wanted to change. She wanted to conquer this fear and start living her best life.   In the summer of 2015 we planned a trip that took her from Pennsylvania, to Florida, to Baltimore and back home.  At the age of 75, she not only flew for the first time, but had several take-offs and landings!  She reveled in the view from the window above the clouds and looking down on “heaven”.   She recently completed a trip with my sister-in-law and her husband “across the pond” to England, meeting extended family and seeing the land of her family’s origin.  None of which would have been possible if she hadn’t let go.

That is why our fifth daily action is LET GO . At this stage of our lives we’ve had time to build up resentments, regrets and sometimes outright fear.  Whoever it is or whatever it was, let it go today.

Beyond the many stories I have  heard while researching grandtoGREAT about the power of letting go, it’s actually been proven to be  scientifically important for our health and to help us age better.

"People with severe life regrets had more cold symptoms, such as nasal congestion, coughs, sneezing, fever and headaches," says Concordia researcher Isabelle Bauer, now a clinical psychologist at the Center for Addiction and Mental Health in Toronto.

Bauer also found an increase in depressive symptoms — such as difficulty sleeping and concentrating — in those with unresolved regret. "Obsessing or ruminating over regrets can also lead to depression and anxiety as you kick yourself over and over," says psychologist Neal Roese, a professor of marketing at the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University in Evanston, Ill.¹

 In a 2012 German study, Stafanie Brassen and her colleagues looked at how healthy young participants (mean age: 25.4 years), healthy older participants (65.8 years), and older participants who had developed depression for the first time later in life (65.6 years) dealt with regret, and found that the young and older depressed patients seemed to hold on to regrets about missed opportunities while the healthy older participants seemed to let them go.²

In grandtoGREAT’s plan of five daily actions, we encourage letting go during the “Morning Meditation”.

Spending five minutes in the morning to release fears, let go of worry and resentment is a practical and proven method for relieving stress and improving health.

There’s also the suggestion that meditation helps us age better. Nothing holds back the wrinkles forever, but meditation keeps us healthier by – a stress hormone which in high levels can contribute to aging, poor heart health and weight gain. The University of California, Los Angeles found that long-term meditators have better preserved brains than those who do not meditate, with the usual loss of grey matter reduced in older meditators.³ reducing cortisol

I’ll leave you today with one final quote on “letting go”.

 

 

 

 

We can’t be afraid of change. You may feel very secure in the pond that you are in, but if you never venture out of it, you will never know that there is such a thing as an ocean, a sea. Holding onto something that is good for you now, may be the very reason why you don’t have something better.
C. JoyBell C.

 

 

¹ http://www.aarp.org/health/healthy-living/info-03-2012/how-to-overcome-regrets-protect-health.html

² https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/how-to-age-well-letting-regrets-go/

 

³  http://www.inwealthandhealth.com/embrace-aging-let-go-of-aging-anxiety-with-meditation/

  

 

 

  

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grandtoGREAT

An Attitude of Gratititude

Be thankful for what you haveyou'll end up having moreIf you concentrate on what you don't have, you will never, ever have enough." - Oprah Winfrey 

I remember watching the Oprah episode in 1996 where she introduced Simple Abundance and the idea of journaling about gratitude daily.  I was a young mother and the ideas in Simple Abundance resonated with me deeply. I started with great enthusiasm but of course, life with two young boys and another on the way, quickly made the “gratitude habit” hard to practice. Fortunately the sentiment and perspective of gratitude has never left me and while I don’t always write it down, I do spend time every day focused on the things I am most grateful for. 

To be sure it’s not the same things every day.  That is the beauty of seeking your gratitude. Some days we feel overwhelmed with responsibilities. We see all the problems in the world and too few solutions.  We have friends and loved ones who are struggling.  It is on those challenging days that gratitude might simply come from a good cup of coffee or a warm bath.  Being grateful for the simple things can help us from concentrating on the things we don’t have and can’t control.

At grand to GREAT, our fourth daily action is GIVE.

GIVEthanks, praise, gratitude, peace.  Meditate or pray, say it out loud or write a note.  Doesn’t matter how, just do it every day.

While there is no question that an “attitude of gratitude” will help you live your best life, there is now scientific proof that it will actually make you healthier! 

“Clinical trials indicate that the practice of gratitude can have dramatic and lasting effects in a person’s life,” said Robert A. Emmons, professor of psychology at UC Davis. “It can lower blood pressure, improve immune function and facilitate more efficient sleep.” One recent study from the University of California San Diego’s School of Medicine found that people who were more grateful actually had better heart health, specifically less inflammation and healthier heart rhythms. Research shows that when we think about what we appreciate, the parasympathetic or calming part of the nervous system is triggered and that can have protective benefits on the body, including decreasing cortisol levels and perhaps increasing oxytocin, the bonding hormone involved in relationships that make us feel so good.¹

Even more importantly, gratitude helps you become “UNAGEABLE”.  George Vaillant, in his book, Aging Well which is based on the Harvard Study of Adult Development, concludes that “[those] who have aged most successfully are those who worry less about cholesterol and waistlines and more about gratitude…”²

“Some people may not be grateful by nature but it is a habit you can get accustomed to,” said Dr. Norman Rosenthal, a psychiatrist and author of “Winter Blues.” “One very good way is being aware of comparing up. It’s a formula for unhappiness because you can always find a person who is more advantaged than you are.”  Come winter, and endless days of rain I have to work harder and the coffee and bath tub are frequently repeated.  I will admit, during the summers in Oregon it is simply easier for me to be grateful.

‘Gratitude is a simple and effective practice and the benefits are real and attainable. Many of us know this in our hearts, but now it's proven by modern science. Gratitude creates a healthier, happier and more fulfilling state of being for anyone who takes a few moments to feel and reflect on it.’

What can you find today to be grateful for?  

www.grandtogreatlife.com

Sources:

¹ http://www.today.com/health/be-thankful-science-says-gratitude-good-your-health-t58256

² AGING WELL:  Surprising Guideposts to a Happier Life from the Landmark Harvard Study of Adult  Development, George E. Valliant, 2002

Sara Childre, president of the Institute of HeartMath

 

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grandtoGREAT
A great quote from Grandma Moses isn't it?  And view her painting, "Autumn"  HERE
To say that education was important in my family, would definitely be an understatement.   My mother was an elementary school teacher prior to staying home with me, and my father was a teacher, principal and ultimately throughout all of my school years, the Superintendent of Schools.  I was raised by teachers.
 
What has been wonderful to watch, as my father  has aged, retired and aged some more, is how his lifelong emphasis on learning has continued to shape his life. Even at nearly 90 years of age, he challenges himself to keep learning and he  exemplifies the second daily action for the grand to GREAT lifestyle.
 
LEARN-- there is a world of information at your fingertips.  From your library, computer, smartphone and television the world is your oyster. Learn something new every day.
 
 Anna Mary Robertson Moses, more commonly known by her nickname, Grandma Moses was a renowned American folk artist.  ‘Her works have been shown and sold in the United States and abroad and have been marketed on greeting cards and other merchandise. Moses' paintings are displayed in the collections of many museums. The Sugaring Off was sold for US $1.2 million in 2006.’
What is perhaps most incredible about her art, is the fact that Grandma Moses didn’t have her first showing of her work,   until 1940               at the age of 80.  
In her earlier life she had enjoyed “hobby art” including embroidery and quilting but it wasn’t until after she developed arthritis in her hands at the age of 76, that she decided to learn painting.  And even then, after she became prolific in her painting, pain in her right hand forced her to change hands and she learned to paint left-handed. 

“Life is what we make it, always has been, always will be."  -Grandma Moses
 
 From television shows to podcasts, from community colleges to books, and of course the internet--the world is at your fingertips.   And today, it has never been easier to find things to learn.  Learning keeps your mind and spirit engaged with the world.
 
‘It is reported that older people who are involved in learning benefit in terms of their own health and well-being, that they lead a more active social life and become involved in their local community.  Thus elderly people can boost their brainpower simply by learning a new skill – such as learning a new language.  Furthermore, there is strong evidence which suggest that learning can delay or prevent the onset of dementia.’
 
Ongoing learning significantly benefits older people’s mental health and consequently reduces reliability on medication.  Consistent learning will help an older person to keep their brain active and having the opportunity to discuss matters in a classroom is a socializing event, it is an effective method to reduce isolation, loneliness and depression which unfortunately can come with old age.'
 
’Two-thirds of all men and women who have lived beyond the age of 65 in the entire history of the world are alive today," says aging expert Ken Dychtwald. This includes 45,000 Americans over 100. And the longevity trend will continue. Baby boom authority Cheryl Russell predicts that one million boomers will reach the century mark.  We are growing older, that fact is undeniable. 
grand to GREAT is fundamentally about learning.  It’s about learning new habits to live your best life from 55 to 105, to become ‘UNAGEABLE’.  
How you live your life from 55 to 105 is really up to you. Last week's blog focused on MOVE.  This week is LEARN.  What do you suppose next week has in store? For today, even the statistics above can count as something you’ve learned.
 
(See how easy that was?). 
To your greatness!  www.grandtogreatlife.com/blog
“Even now / I am not old. / I never think of it, and yet / I am a grandmother to eleven grandchildren." -Grandma Moses
 
 
* quoted from Cordantcare.com and Mike Bellah, Ph. D @ bestyears.com
 
grandtoGREAT
The image HERE  is a poem I wrote for my Dad on his 70th birthday.  In my ignorance back then, I sort of thought my Dad was getting “old”. I was still relatively “young” of course and I lacked perspective.  The last 20 years has provided more and I have certainly learned how “aging” happens in both shared ways and unique ways.
 
Most people who know me, know that my Dad is the shining light of my life.  A steadfast example to me and my family of what it means to be “unageable”. At nearly 90 years of age he is still mentally sharp, physically active and quite frankly leads a more active social schedule than my own. While the whole concept of “blogging” and content marketing is somewhat lost on him—he asked me if I was going to “twixt” something—that is his word for “texting” but also “tweeting”—he is still learning all the time and is connected to his family, friends and community through both  personal and technological ways.   
 
What he has had to do to maintain his “unageable” status is fundamentally simple though not always easy. As he is really the backbone of this whole project and a  vivid example of living a life that isn’t defined by his chronological age it seemed fitting that on Father’s Day, we would step forward into the public light.
 
The blog, the website, the Facebook page, Instagram and Twitter are all live today. We couldn’t be more excited to share grand to GREAT with the world.  We are thrilled with where we are going and the people we will help with our plans. 
 
It’s not easy getting older and this blog will acknowledge some of the obstacles but we’re also going to focus on how what we can do to live our best lives from 55 to 105!  And if you like what you are reading, I hope you will comment, share and come along for the ride.
 
Did you know?
 
It is predicted that by the year 2030, 70 million US citizens will be over the age of 65.  And 8.5 million people will be over the age of 85.  The “oldest old” Americans (those over the age of 85) are the fasting growing age group in the country. According to the CDC, if you live to the age of 65 you can expect to live on average another 19.3 years!   
 
To put that in perspective—when my parents were born (1928 and 1931) the average life expectancy in the United States for men was 59.7.  That’s right, not even 60 years of age.  
 
What this means is that historically we haven’t seen a lot of examples of “unageable” living.  Those who make it past 85, 90 and beyond are the outliers.  We want to know their secrets because they seem and statistically are extraordinary.   But the truth of it is, that as baby boomers and Gen “X” age, there will be huge numbers of people who survive to 85 and beyond.   
 
This blog wants to inspire people to take daily actions to improve their lives from 55 and beyond.  In truth, starting before 55 is not a bad idea either.  But regardless of your age, your income, your relative health—you will be successful with the grand to GREAT philosophy and strategy in place.     
Happy Father's Day!
 
grandtoGREAT
“How old would you be if you didn’t know how old you were?”–Satchel Paige
 
 
 
It’s baseball season and being in Oregon, the whole state has been focused on the Oregon State Beavers historic season and journey to win the NCAA World Series.  They just got their 26 game winning streak broken this week so it seems like a baseball theme is well-timed. 
 
I love this quote from Satchel Paige.  Satchel Paige was renowned for throwing the fast ball—an incredible fast ball—and for how long he was able to keep throwing the fast ball that hard. He pitched for more than 40 years, often year-round, himself claiming to have pitched around 2500 games with at least 50 no-hitters.  Did you know that after he retired from the MLB a few years later, he resurfaced for a swan song night with the Kansas City (Oakland) Athletics, as the named starting pitcher against the Boston Red Sox? At age 59 years, 2 months and 18 days, he became the oldest player in major league history.
 
We aren’t all destined to be major league baseball stars, like Leroy “Satchel” Paige but his example of achieving something historical at almost sixty years of age is certainly inspirational. And being an athlete, he is a great example of the first maxim of living the grand to GREAT lifestyle. 
 
 
MOVE  Every day.  
 
Whether big or small it doesn’t matter at all, but you need to MOVE, every day.
 
 
 
‘A recent Swedish study found that physical activity was the number one contributor to longevity, adding extra years to your life—even if you don’t start exercising until your senior years. But getting active is not just about adding years to your life, it’s about adding life to your years. You’ll not only look better when you exercise, you’ll feel sharper, more energetic, and experience a greater sense of well-being.
 
“Age is a question of mind over matter. If you don't mind, it doesn't matter.”- Satchel Paige
 
Starting or maintaining a regular exercise routine can be a challenge at any age—and it doesn’t get any easier as you get older. You may feel discouraged by health problems, aches and pains, or concerns about injuries or falls. If you've never exercised before, you may not know where to begin, or perhaps you think you're too old or frail, can never live up to the standards you set when you were younger. Or maybe you just think that exercise is boring.
 
While these may seem like good reasons to slow down and take it easy as you age, they're even better reasons to get moving. Becoming more active can energize your mood, relieve stress, help you manage symptoms of illness and pain, and improve your overall sense of well-being. And reaping the rewards of exercise doesn’t have to involve strenuous workouts or trips to the gym. It’s about adding more movement and activity to your life, even in small ways. No matter your age or physical condition, it’s never too late to get your body moving, boost your health and outlook, and improve how you age.’
 
 
 
There are many reasons that older adults give for not maintaining exercise habits and for getting more sedentary. Let’s look at some common excuses and see how valid they really are.
 
1)      “It doesn’t matter what I do—I’m going to get old anyway”
 
Actually regular physical activity helps you look and feel younger and stay independent longer. It also lowers your risk for a variety of conditions, including Alzheimer’s and dementia, heart disease, diabetes, certain cancers, high blood pressure, and obesity.
 
                                                      2)      “I might risk falling or getting injured”
 
Nope—not the case. Regular exercise, by building strength and stamina, prevents loss of bone mass and improves balance, actually reducing your risk of falling.
 
     3)   “I will never be able to do what I could do when I was younger."
‘Changes in hormones, metabolism, bone density, and muscle mass mean that strength and performance levels inevitably decline with age, but that doesn’t mean you can no longer derive a sense of achievement from physical activity or improve your health. The key is to set lifestyle goals that are appropriate to your age. And remember: a sedentary lifestyle takes a much greater toll on athletic ability than biological aging.’
 
                                                     4)      “I’m too old to start exercising”
 
‘You’re never too old to get moving and improve your health! In fact, adults who become active later in life often show greater physical and mental improvements than their younger counterparts.’
 
Instead of looking for reasons not to MOVE everyday.  Why not look for how you will!   
 
Along the lines of that famous slogan for Nike (Just do it)  I’ll leave you with one more quote from Satchel Paige. It’s a baseball quote, but the message applies.  Your goal isn't to throw strikes, but to live an “UNAGEABLE” life.  The goal stays the same, just like home plate—you just need to start taking actions to get there. 
“Just take the ball and throw it where you want to. Throw strikes. Home plate don't move.” Satchel Paige
 
http://grandtogreatlife.com/blog.html
 
Quoted from Helpguide.org. Written by Lawrence Robinson, Melinda Smith, M.A., and Jeanne Segal, Ph.D. Last updated: April 2017