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RoseRed135

Do you suffer from Seasonal Affective Disorder?

21 posts in this topic

Do you tend to feel sadder/"bluer" during the winter months? Are you more likely to feel "down" or depressed when days are shorter and there is less sunlight? In short, do you experience Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) at this time of year? And if so, how do you cope?

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I'm starting a petition to abolish Daylight Savings Time....

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I think I do. Moving from New England to Southern California helped with that. Didn't solve it, but oh my, it is so nice to have more sun available. 

Daylight savings...ugh. PITA. 

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@TaxiMomma - Sorry if you have this condition. But glad the move has helped!

@Mame925 & @TaxiMomma But I;m confused... If Daylight Savings Time gives us more daylight hours, isn't that helpful to people w/ SAD? So why abolish it in this context? Or is it for reasons unrelated to SAD?

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The daylight hours are the same-they just happen in a different band of accepted time. 

Clock time is a human construct. For me, it takes weeks to get used to the "time adjustment". Besides, it's a pain in the butt to change over all the clocks that aren't internet connected. 

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I don't like the sun all that much and prefer less of it.  So, winter is a favorite season of mine with the shorter days of less sunlight, and summer is the least favorite.  As a result of my sun aversion, I have a vitamin D deficiency which is also common with SAD.   I supplement with vitamin D and also try to run or walk outside to get some natural vitamin D.

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I was diagnosed with SAD several years ago. There were several things I did to help myself. I took supplements, exercised, cleared my mental junk, changed my diet, and found a purpose. I also found the company you keep also makes a big difference.I am fortunate to say that I have not had an episode since 2008.

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Thanks for the different perspectives, ladies!

@VioletEMT - So sorry to that you have SAD. But glad you've found ways to cope w/ it. And especially glad that you haven't experienced an episode in 8 years!

BTW, you say it helped to find "a purpose." Care to tell us what that purpose is?

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@rosered135 I don't have a problem with the adjustment, I just think that DST is a manufactured idea that no longer serves a purpose. Leave the natural rhythms of the day to Mother Nature. Days are automatically shorter in winter and longer in summer. Arizona manages just fine without it....

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The purpose was to reach outside of my own pain and help someone else.This is one of the reasons why I do EMS. A provider once told me that it was a privilege to walk into someone's home when they are at their most vulnerable and worst and help them. I think this is how it is with any mental or physical issue. We all find places where we are at our most vulnerable, and sometimes, we need people to support us without judgement, point us in the right direction so we can help ourselves, but also know when to set a boundary.

 

The thing about SAD is one is not only dealing with the outer extended darkness that screws with the body physically, one is also dealing with an inner darkness that torques with you mentally and emotionally. The thing that people don't realize is that, sometimes, this too is a gift. One is able to understand a depth of suffering that some cannot fathom.The kicker is learning how to deal with it appropriately and helping others to do the same without becoming a monster in the process. I recently had to part ways with a co-worker because how this person coped with pain was by being emotionally abusive. Rather than cope with pain in a healthy manner, the person used their pain as a crutch to mistreat people. After months of dealing with this, we parted ways as it was starting to affect my job performance.

 

I read posts on these boards and know that some of these posters have dealt with some form trauma that some people will never be able to understand or even grasp the concept of. Personally, those are the ones that give the best advice.

 

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On ‎2‎/‎11‎/‎2016 at 0:34 PM, VioletEMT said:

The purpose was to reach outside of my own pain and help someone else.This is one of the reasons why I do EMS. A provider once told me that it was a privilege to walk into someone's home when they are at their most vulnerable and worst and help them. I think this is how it is with any mental or physical issue. We all find places where we are at our most vulnerable, and sometimes, we need people to support us without judgement, point us in the right direction so we can help ourselves, but also know when to set a boundary.

 

The thing about SAD is one is not only dealing with the outer extended darkness that screws with the body physically, one is also dealing with an inner darkness that torques with you mentally and emotionally. The thing that people don't realize is that, sometimes, this too is a gift. One is able to understand a depth of suffering that some cannot fathom.The kicker is learning how to deal with it appropriately and helping others to do the same without becoming a monster in the process. I recently had to part ways with a co-worker because how this person coped with pain was by being emotionally abusive. Rather than cope with pain in a healthy manner, the person used their pain as a crutch to mistreat people. After months of dealing with this, we parted ways as it was starting to affect my job performance.

 

I read posts on these boards and know that some of these posters have dealt with some form trauma that some people will never be able to understand or even grasp the concept of. Personally, those are the ones that give the best advice.

 

Fascinating post, Violet, IMO!

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We live in one of the blue zones of the US, meaning the areas with the least amount of sun -- mostly during the colder months- And I've discovered lack of sun definitely messes the body and mind- Over this past winter I've looked in the mirror and thought, "Larva .. you look like larva dressed in tshirt and jeans .. creepy, Nosferatu larva!"- Not a healthy mantra- But agree with VioletEMT that navigating murky mind-frames, personally, leads to understanding others- I didn't grow up in a blue zone, but after years of exposure to it think that this past winter was a turning point-

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I definitely do! Cabin-fever (real bad)!! Sometimes as early as January! Ugh!

I just spend my days keeping busy doing things. baking, cooking, cleaning, reading, visiting (when we do). It helps, but nothing cures my SAD better (of faster) than when springtime arrives!

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I like winters . Fresh white clean pretty snow , a crock pot of something slow cooking ( stew or chili  ) and a huge fireplace fire .

I like spring too , Can still burn a fire and go outside with less garments on.

Summer is my favorite , tanning swimming, BBQ. I BBQ the other day . I am a generally happy person but I am teary tonight thinking of my 

GK's missing em. 

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@GrandNonna - So sorry that you're missing your GKs so badly. (((Hugs)))

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Since days are getting shorter and winter will be here soon enough, bringing this thread back to the front...

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There was a petition to get Daylight Savings Time abolished in California....apparently there weren't enough signatures to get it on the ballot....bummer...I would love to get rid of DST.

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bump

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Vitamin D is a major component of the chemicals in our brains that prevent depression. An incomplete form of vitamin D is present in our skin and converted to the complete form. If we dont get enough light, we dont get enough vitamin D and depression can easily follow, even without bad things happening in our lives.

Sunshine matters. So does getting enough vitamin D in our diet, especially in winter months when our skin Vitamin D isnt interacting with sunshine as much as it is in sunnier months.

Edited by KaIana
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Wondering... does anyone find that January is the worst month for SAD? Or is the whole winter about the same?

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I don't consider my issue true SAD...but during the winter especially when we have several foggy, cloudy or dreary days in a row, I have to open up the curtains so I have more light in the house.  There isn't enough wattage to do that trick.

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