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Mame925

(The New) What Are You Reading?

100 posts in this topic

Hillbilly Elegy by J. D. Vance should be mandatory reading for anyone trying to make sense of, and understand, how each life creates a collective reaction that impacts all life -- in America and beyond- Although the focus of the book is about a particular region of America, plenty of Americans in different regions are suffering from the similar, which sheds more light on the outcome of the election and how for some it was no surprise and why others were shocked out of their minds- But the book itself isn't about the election- It's a memoir about a man, a family and a culture in crisis that began in the 70's- It's brutally honest to the core but also funny and heartwarming in parts- It's about poverty but also about getting out of it without severing himself completely from his demons and family history going forward- That said, through the majority of the book he's speaking from experience but towards the last part of the book he shares his political views and so forth which reveals his inexperience with the dysfunctions of the elite -- which are no different than the dysfunctions of lower classes- Money doesn't fix stupid- It can only be used to pay for stupid mistakes- Which is what I guess the author was driving at without coming straight out and saying it- He comes across like he's better than instead off better off financially than he once was- Excellent read-

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I got sucked into sappy Christmas novels .. and I'm loving it-

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I finished "Adventures In Grocery Shopping"...and I've been asked to be a reviewer. In the Phillie area where Dan (the author) lives, his book has been selected as one of the best books of 2016.

My sister just gave me a pile of novels she's finished with. We have such different reading interests, I'm going at it with a rather skeptical eye. Stay tuned.

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3 hours ago, Mame925 said:

I finished "Adventures In Grocery Shopping"...and I've been asked to be a reviewer. Cool, Mame! Congrats! In the Phillie area where Dan (the author) lives, his book has been selected as one of the best books of 2016.

My sister just gave me a pile of novels she's finished with. We have such different reading interests, I'm going at it with a rather skeptical eye. Stay tuned.

LOL! Who knows? Maybe you'll find a new interest!

 

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1 hour ago, RoseRed135 said:

LOL! Who knows? Maybe you'll find a new interest!

We both like historical fiction, but she like the middle ages/medieval times and my preference is American history 17th-20th centuries....The Midwife Mysteries may be ok as they are set in 17thc. England, we'll see

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On 12/17/2016 at 3:42 PM, Mame925 said:

I finished "Adventures In Grocery Shopping"...and I've been asked to be a reviewer. In the Phillie area where Dan (the author) lives, his book has been selected as one of the best books of 2016.

My sister just gave me a pile of novels she's finished with. We have such different reading interests, I'm going at it with a rather skeptical eye. Stay tuned.

How do you do it? I've a very difficult time writing reviews about books- Is it a knack or is there a format you follow? I mean when writing about literature you love it seems it would be so easy but for me it simply isnt- I think I try too hard to be convincing- When I read reviews of books on Amazon or even sometimes in the Times I think, Wait! You're giving too much information away! And stop reading the review- Blurbs are important for sales, but even when I read a good summary I find I give the book a try -- and when I say try, I mean borrow- I no longer buy- But even if I could write a good review of a borrowed book, like yourself, I could help promote at the very least an in interest in authors I enjoy- Like for example, write better reviews for books at Amazon, or Goodreads-

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I'm reading The Mistletoe Inn by Richard Paul Evans-

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36 minutes ago, Komorebi said:

I'm reading The Mistletoe Inn by Richard Paul Evans-

Sounds perfect for the season!

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2 hours ago, Komorebi said:

How do you do it? I've a very difficult time writing reviews about books- Is it a knack or is there a format you follow? I mean when writing about literature you love it seems it would be so easy but for me it simply isnt- I think I try too hard to be convincing- When I read reviews of books on Amazon or even sometimes in the Times I think, Wait! You're giving too much information away! And stop reading the review- Blurbs are important for sales, but even when I read a good summary I find I give the book a try -- and when I say try, I mean borrow- I no longer buy- But even if I could write a good review of a borrowed book, like yourself, I could help promote at the very least an in interest in authors I enjoy- Like for example, write better reviews for books at Amazon, or Goodreads-

I'll be all positives about this because I enjoyed it so much...and since I actually know Dan, I can talk about the quirks in his personality that make this book work so well.

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I'm reading "A Spool of Blue Thread" by Anne Tyler :-)

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Just started Judith Viorst's Alexander and the Wonderful, Marvelous. Excellent, Terrific Ninety Days. It's an interesting, detailed account of the time that her DS, Alexander, and his DW and family moved back in w/ Viorst and her DH for 3 months. Of course, it's already giving me ideas for topics here in this Community. No doubt, I'll be referring to it a few times, if not more.

Edited by RoseRed135
omitted word in book title
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On 12/26/2016 at 10:23 PM, RoseRed135 said:

Just started Judith Viorst's Alexander and the Wonderful, Marvelous. Excellent, Terrific Ninety Days. It's an interesting, detailed account of the time that her DS, Alexander, and his DW and family moved back in w/ Viorst and her DH for 3 months. Of course, it's already giving me ideas for topics here in this Community. No doubt, I'll be referring to it a few times, if not more.

After reading your post, I borrowed it from the library- Fun read thus far! LOVED the part about bringing back the playpen!!! I'd of never got anything done without one!

Edited by RoseRed135
to reflect editing of quoted post
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15 hours ago, Komorebi said:

After reading your post, I borrowed it from the library- Fun read thus far! LOVED the part about bringing back the playpen!!! I'd of never got anything done without one!

LOL! Actually, I added a quote from Viorst's playpen comments to my playpen thread in GCfG if you'd care to comment there:

 

 

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I'm reading Small Great Things by Jodi Picoult-

"It’s about racism, white privilege and the inherited inequities of America’s past and present."  She said it was one her hardest novels to write and the Washington Post called it her most important- You can listen to an interview with the author at New Hampshire public radio Writers on a New England Stage-

Here's a summary .. (not mine ..)

#1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • With richly layered characters and a gripping moral dilemma that will lead readers to question everything they know about privilege, power, and race, Small Great Things is the stunning new page-turner from Jodi Picoult.

Ruth Jefferson is a labor and delivery nurse at a Connecticut hospital with more than twenty years’ experience. During her shift, Ruth begins a routine checkup on a newborn, only to be told a few minutes later that she’s been reassigned to another patient. The parents are white supremacists and don’t want Ruth, who is African American, to touch their child. The hospital complies with their request, but the next day, the baby goes into cardiac distress while Ruth is alone in the nursery. Does she obey orders or does she intervene?

Ruth hesitates before performing CPR and, as a result, is charged with a serious crime. Kennedy McQuarrie, a white public defender, takes her case but gives unexpected advice: Kennedy insists that mentioning race in the courtroom is not a winning strategy. Conflicted by Kennedy’s counsel, Ruth tries to keep life as normal as possible for her family—especially her teenage son—as the case becomes a media sensation. As the trial moves forward, Ruth and Kennedy must gain each other’s trust, and come to see that what they’ve been taught their whole lives about others—and themselves—might be wrong.

With incredible empathy, intelligence, and candor, Jodi Picoult tackles race, privilege, prejudice, justice, and compassion—and doesn’t offer easy answers. Small Great Things is a remarkable achievement from a writer at the top of her game.
 

 

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Fern Michaels latest edition in the Sisterhood series, Crash and Burn

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I borrowed the two newest "Diary of a Wimpy Kid" books from my #3 grandson. I started reading them when I supervised the middle school library (I needed to see what the kids were reading so I could make recommendations)....very funny stick sketch "diary" entries about regular life told from the kid's perspective.

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Hi all, I just finished reading Small Great Things by Jodi Picoult. I loved it. A few of my friends were reading it and they recommended I do too. Easy read, tough subject of racism. I see a few of you have read it too. I have only read one other Jodi Picoult book, I know she tackles tough issues. I've added her book "House Rules" to my list.  Now I'm reading "Carry On" by Lisa Fenn.  It came highly recommended and is a local writer and attends my sister's church so I'm giving it a shot. So far so good. A touching story of resilience and empathy. THis book  is by Lisa Fenn, a writer for ESPN, it came about after she did an article about these two outstanding young men who overcame so much despite a multitude of personal and health problems. Heartbreakingly beautiful. I think the next book I read will be a bit lighter. Lol

Be well, Peace!

IMG_4501.JPG

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I like Jodi Picoult as well. I particularly enjoyed Plain Truth, her story of an infant death in the Amish community.

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I think my favorite Picoult book besides My Sisters Keeper was Handle with Care.

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Thought I'd pop in here to catch up with some other grandparents and saw this thread. Hallelujah! I'm a bookaholic. Always have a book with me.

My preference is something I can get my teeth into - a book I don't want to put down. I enjoy everything from who-dun-its to books like, "The Girls" by Lori Lansens - a story about conjoined twins and their life (told Jodi Picoult style, from each other's perspective) - because it makes me think about something I've never thought about before. Does that make sense?

I'm currently reading White Teeth (can't comment yet) by Zadie Smith (because of reading her article on optimism and despair ... link below... a good intellectual read, IMO).

http://www.nybooks.com/articles/2016/12/22/on-optimism-and-despair/

In my bathroom, for tub soaks especially, I always have a buffet of current magazines and something along the line of a Marianne Williamson's "A Woman's Worth". For example.

Since I was a little girl, there's always a stack beside my bed. The stack has changed from The Bobbsey Twins... to 25+ books on what having a baby is all about... to my current mix: some healing books mixed in with fiction and non. That's when I read the most - just before zzz's. ('Cause if I started earlier in the day, I'd never get anything else done.)

I believe I've read all of Jodi Picoult's books. She's a particular fave - even if she does use a fairly constant recipe for her structure. I enjoy her depth, her research, her twists, and her message(s).

Me Before You - didn't want it to end. Same with many books... they're my adventure into other worlds, to escape my sometimes painful missing-the-grandkids pity party. (I had a good gk dose at Christmas, so I'm fine at the moment. Broke, but fine.)

Next on my reading list: China Rich Girlfriends by Kevin Kwan (he wrote Crazy Rich Asians). It was an impulse buy.

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The Whistler by John Grisham- And before that My Name Is Lucy Barton by Elizabeth Strout- 

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I'm back in library services for a few weeks so I have 1000s of books at my fingertips with no effort at all! I'm reading Toni Morrison's "Beloved" currently. Its assigned reading for senior English these days so in order to discuss & review with the kids I need to finally read it. 

Most popular check out in the library is "Hidden Figures", now an Academy Award nominee for best picture and supporting actress nominations. When the kids are checking things back in I always ask how they liked whatever they read. 

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Just stumbled on this title on FB:

A generation of sociopaths : how the baby boomers betrayed America by Bruce Gibney

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Currently reading "The Fault In Our Stars" by John Green. Teen romance with a twist. So far quite charming.

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That was a good read ..^

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