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Mame925

(The New) What Are You Reading?

97 posts in this topic

Nevertheless: A Memoir by Alec Baldwin- Fascinating, mess!

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Finishing up The Fault In Our Stars....enjoying it immensely. Next up is "Hidden Figures"...I'm at my favorite high school until mid May, so will have some time. This job is year around, but should be short hours on a school calendar...

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I tried to read "Hidden Figures" after I had watch a documentary about the real life ladies of the West Area.  After that the book was just too dry.  I rented the movie just this week online...it is one I could watch over and over.  Brilliant minds. 

Now I want to see "Fences".

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Posted (edited)

Just finished The Letter, by Kathryn Hughes. Improbable in some ways, IMO, but very gripping. Could barely put it down.

Edited by RoseRed135

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I didn't get very far in Hidden Figures, guess the movie will have to be the way into the story. I very much enjoyed Fault In Our Stars. I also just finished The Hired Girl. It's teen historical fiction, but since I'm still at the high school for a few more weeks, I'm checking into all that's offered. I've started In My Hands, the true story of a young Polish woman's experience in **** occupied Poland as an accidental resistance worker. Wonderfully well written by Irene Gut Opdyke...

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Behind Closed Door by B. A. Paris- It's supposed to be a psychological thriller but something about it reminds me of the film Secretary which was based on a short story by Mary Gaitskill-

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Posted (edited)

I just finished "Ruby" by Ann Hood. It is about a young widow, Olivia, who catches a pregnant teenager, Ruby, breaking into her summer home.  This is actually the second time I have read it.

I read a review on yours and my local library has access to it online.  I'll check it out soon.

When the electricity was off yesterday, I started "Redemption Road" by John Hart.  Now I need to check out what else he has written.

Edited by SueSTx

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1 hour ago, SueSTx said:

I just finished "Ruby" by Ann Hood. It is about a young widow, Olivia, who catches a pregnant teenager, Ruby, breaking into her summer home.  This is actually the second time I have read it.

I read a review on yours and my local library has access to it online.  I'll check it out soon.

When the electricity was off yesterday, I started "Redemption Road" by John Hart.  Now I need to check out what else he has written.

Something about that description reminded me of the movie The Spitfire Grill-

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As I mentioned elsewhere, I'm rereading How To Talk So Kids Will Listen And Listen So Kids Will Talk by Adele Faber and Elaine Mazlish. It helped me years ago when I was going through a rough patch w/ my DDs. My DGC are such dolls, but DGS can be a handful, sometimes, and well-behaved DGD is at the age where she's developing an "attitude." Add to that the fact that I have less patience now than I did as a mom. and that means some unpleasant moments. I felt I needed a "refresher" to deal those and prevent them as much as possible. It's already working. :)

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My 'go to' phrase for the snotty attitudes is "are you sure that's what you meant to say?" It shows I was listening and heard what they said. Their usual response is a blank look then you can see the wheels turning while they try to rephrase. Occasionally the attitudes continued so we moved on to "I will not allow you to talk to me that way, so until you can be civil the answer is I'm not going to discuss this, so no". 

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A Square Meal: A Culinary History of the Great Depression by Jane Ziegelman and Andrew Coe

Thus far it is fascinating!

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This book ^^^ is so absolutely fascinating!  .. did you know that pie was once a staple at each meal? Each meal .. can you imagine? Also funny how social/societal attitudes keep coming around again and again and fleeing one place for the next, from country to city, from city to country because one or the other is best -- or better- How when asked if life on the farm gets lonely and the response is something on the order of "Lonely?  Surrounded by all this life?  From flowers and vegetables to chickens and bees? Lonely?"

I'm rereading chapters twice because they're so enjoyable!

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This book sounds just like something I will totally love. My dad grew up on poor farms in the South in the 20s/30s...I know about the pie thing. My mom grew up on a dairy farm in the midwest...pie was big there too. Neither had a problem with the kids having pie for breakfast...so we did, as often as it was available. Same with cobbler. I could be very happy living a country life.

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I read the most amazing book this morning.  "We Never Asked for Wings" by Vanessa Diffenbaugh copyright 2015, but so appropriate for right now.  This story includes the use of ICE, DACA and ORR. 

The next time I go to the library I need to find her first book, "The Language of Flowers" which was a NYT best seller.

It isn't unusual for me to flip over and read the last couple of chapters about half way through a book...not this one, I didn't want to ruin the story or miss a single word.

 

 

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9 hours ago, SueSTx said:

I read the most amazing book this morning.  "We Never Asked for Wings" by Vanessa Diffenbaugh copyright 2015, but so appropriate for right now.  This story includes the use of ICE, DACA and ORR. 

The next time I go to the library I need to find her first book, "The Language of Flowers" which was a NYT best seller.

It isn't unusual for me to flip over and read the last couple of chapters about half way through a book...not this one, I didn't want to ruin the story or miss a single word.

 

 

Sue, I loved the language of flowers- I honestly cant remember if I read the one you mentioned but will check it out-

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Posted (edited)

You Don't Look Your Age .. And Other Fairytales by Sheila Nevins- The audio book version of this collection of essays are read by the author and Cynthia Adler, Alan Alda, Bob Balaban, Christine Baranski, Kathy Bates, Ellen Burstyn, Glenn Close, Katie Couric, John Henry Cox, Blythe Danner, Lena Dunham, Edie Falco, Tovah Feldshuh, Diane von Furstenberg, Whoopi Goldberg, Gayle King, Diane Lane, Sandra Lee, Judith Light, Jenna Lyons, Audra McDonald, Janet Mock, Sheila Nevins, Rosie O'Donnell, Jean Richards, RuPaul, Liz Smith, Lesley Stahl, Gloria Steinem, Martha Stewart, Meryl Streep, Marlo Thomas, Lily Tomlin, and Gloria Vanderbilt.

The reading of these by the above ^ really brings these essays to life -- and to light- Some are incredibly sad, some hysterical, all "life stories"- The kind of stuff one might think but not express- Lily Tomlin is a hoot .. I love Christine Baranski ..

 

Edited by Komorebi
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Ordinary Grace by William Kent Krueger

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I'm back at the highschool subbing already....lots of stuff to choose from

Currently I Am The Messenger by Markus Zuzak (who wrote The Book Thief, one of my all time favorites)

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Milk and Honey - by Rupi Kaur and My Life So Far - by Jane Fonda

Edited by Komorebi

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During my cleaning in the spare room I found Cheaper By The Dozen....always been a favorite...

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On 11/28/2017 at 6:28 PM, Mame925 said:

During my cleaning in the spare room I found Cheaper By The Dozen....always been a favorite...

And it's sequel Bells on Their Toes....continuing the story after the death of Frank Sr. I'll be passing them on to DS, who has 5 children...he'll get some great ideas on how to manage a large household.

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16 minutes ago, Mame925 said:

And it's sequel Bells on Their Toes....continuing the story after the death of Frank Sr. I'll be passing them on to DS, who has 5 children...he'll get some great ideas on how to manage a large household.

:)

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