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RoseRed135

... And the "most important issue" is...??

17 posts in this topic

According to a recent poll, most Americans see health care as the most significant of today's issues:

https://www.aol.com/article/news/2017/07/17/poll-americans-say-heatlh-care-is-most-important-issue/23034284/

Is that so, in your opinion? Is health care the most important issue? How about jobs/the economy? terrorism? climate change? Etc? What do you think?

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Maybe the most "personal" issue is health care, but I'm not sure I'd say it is the biggest national issue.  to me that would be jobs/the economy.  If people had good jobs, health care would probably be included.

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I think we would be a much healthier country overall if everyone was covered, if everyone cared enough about each others wellbeing without judgement- 

Im wondering if John McCains own health issue will influence his vote-

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From an outsider's perspective, if you don't have access to decent health care, you can't hold a job. You can't contribute to the economy. A healthy nation is a productive nation.

For example: years ago, a friend in the US had a cold that she suspected had turned to bronchitis. She had to wait to go in, b/c she didn't have the copay. Ended up in the ER with pneumonia.

If she'd been seen when she first suspected it was more than a cold, it would've been a fairly 'quick fix'. Having to put it off due to finances ended up w/hospital bills, a much longer recovery, and more lost time at work.

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People in the US have the tendency to go to work even if sick, really sick and in great pain- Some that do have job security concerns while others with such behavior/s do it because it's been ingrained into the fabric of their work ethic/s- After being absent from work for 3 days employees in many places need to provide a note from a doctor to return to work, so there's that, too .. They take two days and then return to work on the third to avoid the added expense- If it sounds stressful, it's because it is- Many simply choose not to stay home and heal properly-

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I used to think jobs/economy was the most important thing, but healthcare is crucial to even be able to hold a job. Plus, people might be apt to switch jobs to ones they're better suited to, if healthcare wasn't a factor in staying with a job they don't like as much. I can only see national productivity climbing if everyone is mentally and physically in better shape to keep this country as strong and as smart as it can be.

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I honestly hate contributing to the western idea of 'healthcare'.    The system looks at numbers and doles out life long prescriptions, injects 2 day old infants with hep b and aluminum, and treats symptoms of disease rather than the disease itself.   It's great for heart surgery or a broken leg, or stitching up an open wound.    Other than that, I don't want to contribute.   It's too often a perveyor of illness- rather than wellness.   And- also the 3rd leading cause of death in the US.  

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You can say NO to the vaccines and chart your own course. I don't do flu shots, pneumonia vaccine, hep vaccine (offered thru my job in healthcare), etc. My last incarnation thru the schools had a list of suggested vaccines, I declined them all. I did do (then reasonable) DPT & polio as a child. My older sister brought home every childhood disease known to man (measles, mumps, chickenpox) that I had before I ever started school. I update tetanus every 10 years or so. I am discussing Guardasil with my kids since my oldest GB just turned 13...I vote no in favor of self awareness & self care. My jury is out on the meningitis-B, but I will have a serious opinion by the time they are applying to college. 

However, @Cedarway, you can't blame the current state of medical affairs all on Big Pharma...the amazing level of noncompliance & denial in our greater population plays a huge part in the current "throw a pill at it" form of healthcare. My Hemaglobin A1C was elevated to what my doctor said was frank diabetes..."here take this twice a day"...Well, no...instead I opted for "mindful eating"....which including reducing simple carbs, reducing junk snacking and eating more fruits/veggies....In six months it was down to respectable levels and in a year was well into the normal range. Dr. is satisfied...DH's niece wants to continue to eat whatever she wants so takes a handful of diabetes medications yet can't figure out why her blood sugars aren't stable and her lab values are always high. She's her own worst enemy then complains about the price of a couple of her meds as they are not yet on the insurance formularies. DH's years of cancer treatment included a big change in his daily diet...to keep his blood counts stable during chemo and pre/post surgery. He recovered relatively quickly from brutal surgeries because of his self care and determination. 

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Thank you for the candid response.   :)   Since the original question was regarding important issues-   I guess I am hoping the future of healthcare will truly be about health, and not this pharma funded study said this or that..  I think health is a truly big issue, but healthcare only covers the type of health approach that I have only seen harm people.   Thank you for sharing your approach to health.    From what I've seen, it the only one that works.  

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9 hours ago, Cedarway said:

I honestly hate contributing to the western idea of 'healthcare'.    The system looks at numbers and doles out life long prescriptions, injects 2 day old infants with hep b and aluminum, and treats symptoms of disease rather than the disease itself.   It's great for heart surgery or a broken leg, or stitching up an open wound.    Other than that, I don't want to contribute.   It's too often a perveyor of illness- rather than wellness.   And- also the 3rd leading cause of death in the US.  

I'm not sure America's approach to healthcare could be considered "western," though. Many European countries believe in preventive medicine, treating the illness rather than the symptoms.

I'll never forget sitting next to an Italian woman on a flight from Atlanta to Rome, and I asked her what she thought of American healthcare while she was living here. She paused (I was afraid I'd offended her), but she gushed forth with nothing but vitriol for the way, she said, "In this country, the whole system is interested in keeping you sick so everyone makes money. In my country, they want citizens to be well. I don't understand why you all don't demand more."

That was about 8 years ago. 

We sent men to the moon, for pete's sake, but we can't figure out how to incorporate universal healthcare into our democracy? Something most developed (and even underdeveloped) countries have figured out long ago?

A travesty. I think it's right up there with the length of time we kept slavery going in this country, an absolutely repulsive indictment on what we REALLY think about human rights, human lives.

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On 7/18/2017 at 11:49 AM, Komorebi said:

People in the US have the tendency to go to work even if sick, really sick and in great pain- Some that do have job security concerns while others with such behavior/s do it because it's been ingrained into the fabric of their work ethic/s- After being absent from work for 3 days employees in many places need to provide a note from a doctor to return to work, so there's that, too .. They take two days and then return to work on the third to avoid the added expense- If it sounds stressful, it's because it is- Many simply choose not to stay home and heal properly-

People also tend to send their children to school if sick so they don't miss work, instead of keeping their sick child/ren home to recover. We used to attend a church where every week some child was sick (there was a LOT of children at that church) and it got old really fast. We had to quit going when we started to care for an elder family member with the notion that we would not be the ones to kill her off due to some cold we contracted from kids at church. Even for extracurricular activities parents just don't keep their kids home when they are sick and the following week more kids are missing from class due to catching whatever it is that went around the week before.

I think colds and flus are getting worse as the years go by. Kind of like, if you don't finish the antibiotics you may need more, stronger antibiotics the next time. Super bugs, super colds, etc. because we don't take care of ourselves in the first place so yea, healthcare is a huge thing to be concerned about.  However, it can be taken care of more easily if caught and taken care of early in most situations.

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On 7/27/2017 at 1:32 PM, Mame925 said:

You can say NO to the vaccines and chart your own course.

I chart my own course regarding vaccines, but not every one has quite a much leeway, as far as I can see.  For example, I have a couple of relatives who are nurses and they say they're required to get flu vaccines every year and had to get certain boosters (I'm not sure which ones) when they first entered nursing school.

And, of course, parents don't necessarily have as much room for choice regarding the vaccination of their kids. To my knowledge, most schools/school systems require certain vaccines. So while parents may be able to delay this/that vaccine for their kids, they often need to make sure they get them by school/preschool age.

I'm not complaining about that - I appreciate the value of "herd immunity," etc. I'm just saying that there are more choices in some situations than others.

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This issue with early childhood vaccines is that often multiple vaccines are offered at one time....as many as 10! That's ridiculous (as well as potentially unsafe)...I don't care how old you are (unless you are in the military, which marches to its own tune). A friend delayed most of her twins' vaccines until just before kindergarten and has spaced out the subsequent boosters, etc as far as possible, usually no more than 2 at a time. They start 4th grade soon and are just now totally caught up....I totally agree with her plan. 

I turn 65 this year...I've declined flu shots for a number of years (including much of my time in health care), won't do the pneumonia shot, shingles vaccine (I've already had shingles, unlikely to repeat), Hep B and the whooping cough pertussis) booster. I will update tetanus as I often work with a variety of tools. 

We have so much more control over our health than you'd think....however, it's up to us to take the control by educating ourselves (everything has pros & cons) then make the best decision in our own interest.

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23 hours ago, Mame925 said:

This issue with early childhood vaccines is that often multiple vaccines are offered at one time....as many as 10! That's ridiculous (as well as potentially unsafe)...I don't care how old you are (unless you are in the military, which marches to its own tune). A friend delayed most of her twins' vaccines until just before kindergarten and has spaced out the subsequent boosters, etc as far as possible, usually no more than 2 at a time. They start 4th grade soon and are just now totally caught up....I totally agree with her plan. 

I turn 65 this year...I've declined flu shots for a number of years (including much of my time in health care), won't do the pneumonia shot, shingles vaccine (I've already had shingles, unlikely to repeat), Hep B and the whooping cough pertussis) booster. I will update tetanus as I often work with a variety of tools. 

We have so much more control over our health than you'd think....however, it's up to us to take the control by educating ourselves (everything has pros & cons) then make the best decision in our own interest.

We were told shingles is likely to come back if you've had it previously. Guess I need to do some research on it. Never had the shot for it. I had chicken pox 4 times! One child had a mild case of chicken pox twice and then got shingles a couple years after that. :(

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The shingles vaccine is about 50% effective in preventing shingles. That's not high enough for me to consent. I was miserable during the outbreak (across my left hip horizontally). It started out looking like a tiny bug bite that morphed to a patch the size of my foot in a matter of hours. With some help from my doctor I created my own treatment plan, some of which he then incorporated into his patient handouts. The pain was like the cat flexing its claws across the worst sunburn you've ever had.

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But does any of this impact on where you (general) see healthcare on the spectrum of today's issues? Or on what you see as the most significant current issue?

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It is having an impact....a great deal has to do with the public not doing their own research. I have coverage thru ACA with a stipend. My coverage is excellent, low deductible and a PPO for a very reasonable price based on my income. I'm at the top end of the scale, but the savings is about $400 per month. I signed up for Medicare supplements recently, which kick in this fall. It will be about $100 more per month for me, but there are no deductibles and few copays. I did my own homework then met with a reputable insurance broker. My coverage also includes international care, a perk for this traveler. He also found me decent dental & eyecare coverage (together they cost about $20 a month). I don't do managed care (HMO) so whatever I have allows me to go just about anywhere and there is no "committee" reviewing my proposed care. My insurance either covers it or it doesn't. The elimination of that gray area is important to me. 

A good broker can be your best friend. It's their job to get you the most bang for your buck...and the insurance companies pay his commissions. If all you can afford is catastrophic care, get it...then make a point to take care of your own health.

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