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Julia33

Culture and taste (literally)

122 posts in this topic

7 minutes ago, Mame925 said:

This has nothing to do with bedside manner. There are doctors out there like Greg House who are caustic, annoying and brilliant...there are also a good selection of Marcus Welby's....neither "type" can make someone do something they don't want to do. The onus will always be on the patient to decide for themselves which path to take.

And this^^^^ is why I really think Julia's DS, ultimately, has to come to a decision, himself, about healthy eating. He needs to realize it's ok to eat different food than DIL does, at least some of the time. And that it's better for him, even if it's less convenient or less comfortable (nicer to prepare the same foods together). Julia can lead by example, invite him to join in some exercise, etc. And those ideas are great as far as encouraging him to take better care of his health and weight. But, in the end, he's the one who has to choose to make a commitment to living a healthier lifestyle/losing the weight - or not. 'You can lead a horse to water, etc..."

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Both Marcus and Greg have to improve communicating what obesity does to the human body and how they communicate those facts in an encouraging manner to their patients in order raise the ratio of patients that will take the initiative to follow through-

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1 minute ago, RoseRed135 said:

And this^^^^ is why I really think Julia's DS, ultimately, has to come to a decision, himself, about healthy eating. He needs to realize it's ok to eat different food than DIL does, at least some of the time. And that it's better for him, even if it's less convenient or less comfortable (nicer to prepare the same foods together). Julia can lead by example, invite him to join in some exercise, etc. And those ideas are great as far as encouraging him to take better care of his health and weight. But, in the end, he's the one who has to choose to make a commitment to living a healthier lifestyle/losing the weight - or not. 'You can lead a horse to water, etc..."

If the parent doesn't drink, it's highly likely that their child won't drink either ..

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22 minutes ago, Komorebi said:

Both Marcus and Greg have to improve communicating what obesity does to the human body and how they communicate those facts in an encouraging manner to their patients in order raise the ratio of patients that will take the initiative to follow through-

You're still blaming the doctor. 

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13 minutes ago, Komorebi said:

If the parent doesn't drink, it's highly likely that their child won't drink either ..

Well, maybe... I imagine the children of big drinkers are more likely than others to grow up to be alcoholics. Yet, I'm sure there are children of non-drinkers who have grown up to be alcoholics, despite their parents' example.

As for Julia's DS, as I understand it, she and DH brought him up to eat healthy, but his diet has now changed. Seeing them stick to a healthy menu may serve as a reminder/an influence to return to healthier food habit.s But, IMO, there's no guarantee.

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3 minutes ago, Mame925 said:

You're still blaming the doctor. 

No, Mame, it's not the doctor's fault that a patient doesn't follow prescribed orders- What's obvious is that just prescribing orders as they always have before isn't working on a grand scale- And the only way to change their practice would be to engage in greater efforts- Be it more interaction, collaboration with patients, research and, yes, creating a chain of consequences- When there is an epidemic doctors roll up their sleeves and risk their own lives to save multitudes- But it's obvious they lean towards complacency when it comes to obesity- If they didn't it wouldn't be increasing- I think pediatricians would stand a better chance initiating changes-

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27 minutes ago, Komorebi said:

But it's obvious they lean towards complacency when it comes to obesity

Seriously? It isn't obvious to me. I've been in on the discussions, I've had the discussion. The bottom line is that nothing will happen until the patient decides to make it happen.

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@Layla - Oops! Your comments posted twice. I deleted the extra post and, somehow, both disappeared! (That shouldn't/doesn't usually happen. Must have been a tech glitch.) Please feel free to repost.

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If you buy an airline ticket and you are overweight the airlines will charge you for two seats. Fast food workers won't tell an overweight person, nope, we can't serve you.

The person has to want whatever the change is. Growing up, my dad smoked. For Lent, every year he'd quit for that period of time, the day Lent was over, he'd start right up again. Go figure. Why didn't he just quit for good since he did this every single year growing up?

@RoseRed; Quote not working correctly: "Well, maybe... I imagine the children of big drinkers are more likely than others to grow up to be alcoholics."

I think too, the opposite can happen. Some children who grow up with an alcoholic parent turn from alcohol understanding how their lives were impacted by it and so want nothing to do with it themselves.

Edited by Cupcake55
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I think children of drinkers also never even taste the stuff once because they are afraid of be an alcoholic without even every trying it.  I also think the tenancy of being an addict runs in families whether it is drugs alcohol or food.

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11 hours ago, Mame925 said:

Seriously? It isn't obvious to me. I've been in on the discussions, I've had the discussion. The bottom line is that nothing will happen until the patient decides to make it happen.

I believe you- :)  Just as much as I believe others who've witnessed and experienced such discussions and came away with a different take- I do agree the patient decides to make it happen- However, I also think the medical community could do more to influence patients decisions -- especially pediatricians-

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41 minutes ago, Komorebi said:

I also think the medical community could do more to influence patients decisions -- especially pediatricians-

How? The obesity studies/guides are all over the internet and in every magazine, newspaper & tv set. The physicians are well informed and actually are talking to their patients. It's being discussed in the schools. Basically the information is being spoon fed to the masses. "Lead a horse to water..."

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Mapping out this weeks cooking, shopping, available containers and freezer space - because I was bored. My husband was driving while listening to a game, kiddies were mostly napping, quietly riding - a miracle.

Julia, maybe this would make you feel better? Make/drop off healthy meals - not say it's healthy.

We make lots and lots of food for our kids, freeze it, drop it off. All but ODD have babies (her youngest is ~3.5 and they live with us anyway). Everybody says they love our cooking, all of them are quite busy. Since we are the cooks we know the ingredients are wholesome, organic, low sugar, low fat, clean foods - not yukky-processed.

My husband makes gallons of red sauce - freezes in meal size containers, pounds of whole wheat pasta, dries and bags it. He makes/freezes pizza without fatty ingredients. We make soups, salsas/chutneys, apple/fruit sauces, main dishes, bread, rolls, muffins, waffles (whole wheat flour), sausage (no preservatives) - easy/cheap drop-offs are endless.

OR when asking about Christmas find out if they want a one-pot, KA mixer, spiralizer, processor - anything to make healthy cooking easy? OR if they'd enjoy blueapron subscription for next year (or similar healthy food service)?

ETA:   We use Pyrex glass lidded containers or Ball plastic jars - give our containers back to us, clean at delivery of more food, or we won't provide any homemade food again. Count on it. The end.

 

Edited by JanelleK
word choice
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35 minutes ago, Mame925 said:

How? The obesity studies/guides are all over the internet and in every magazine, newspaper & tv set. The physicians are well informed and actually are talking to their patients. It's being discussed in the schools. Basically the information is being spoon fed to the masses. "Lead a horse to water..."

Yes, I agree- Infinite information- Including information that contains the fact some physicians (nearly half polled) supported withholding non-emergency treatment for the obese, claiming it's taxing on resources that are already in short supply as well as a devotion of their time to patients who refuse to comply- 

That's a significant shift from devoting ones practice to all patients, birth to death- People "pay" for insurance who in turn pay the doctor whose bedside manner and level of treatment reflect their personal preference/s-

I've one small suggestion for doctors: Use all those fancy charts and human anatomy illustrations in your offices for more than decor but to further explain conditions and treatment- 

 

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What kind of doctor do you go to? That's a serious question. And you can't go in expecting the doctor to offer, offer, offer. The patient has to be their own advocate. DH's sister goes to the doctor on her own agenda...she's not truthful, waits for the doctor to offer without her bringing up a topic then complains because he didn't address her concerns. Her type is very common.

Most of the physicians I've worked with over the years are excellent teachers (one actually mentors first graders). There isn't time to go down a list of possible topics at every visit. If the patient avoids the issues, no doctor can be held responsible. 

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1 hour ago, Komorebi said:

Yes, I agree- Infinite information- Including information that contains the fact some physicians (nearly half polled) supported withholding non-emergency treatment for the obese, claiming it's taxing on resources that are already in short supply as well as a devotion of their time to patients who refuse to comply- 

That's a significant shift from devoting ones practice to all patients, birth to death- People "pay" for insurance who in turn pay the doctor whose bedside manner and level of treatment reflect their personal preference/s-

I've one small suggestion for doctors: Use all those fancy charts and human anatomy illustrations in your offices for more than decor but to further explain conditions and treatment- 

 

Here's the thing: I don't know about the US, but *here*, Drs are pushed for time. They have a LOT of ppl to see in a day, and many, MANY areas have a shortage of general practitioners. I drive over 2 hrs one way (or rather, Wolf does) to see our GP, b/c there's waiting lists for those local to us. We hit walk in clinics if need be, in btwn.

When, exactly, would you like Drs to provide these educational seminars? Here, Drs can (and will) tell a patient that they're obese, briefly outline the health issues, and offer to make a referral to a nutritionist. It's on the patient to follow through. 

Frankly, I think the idea of denying someone non emergent medical care due to a pre-existing condition is both repugnant, and a slippery slope. If you're going to say that those who are obese don't deserve non-emergent care, then that goes for all people with addictions, right? Alcoholics, narcotics, hoarders...can't choose just one. Then, what about other mental illnesses that have an impact on physical health? Well, ditch them til they're compliant with treatment!

Access to health care shouldn't be used as a carrot/stick.

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3 hours ago, JanelleK said:

Mapping out this weeks cooking, shopping, available containers and freezer space - because I was bored. My husband was driving while listening to a game, kiddies were mostly napping, quietly riding - a miracle.

Julia, maybe this would make you feel better? Make/drop off healthy meals - not say it's healthy.

Good idea, IMO! But wouldn't she need to ask first, though, if they'd like her to drop off some meals? Just as you said about the Christmas gift below?

I agree that it's better, in this case, not to mention "healthy." Perhaps just say something like, "Let me know if I can drop off some meals for you guys to make things easier."

Hopefully, they'll jump at it. But if they decline, well then, they decline.

 

OR when asking about Christmas find out if they want a one-pot, KA mixer, spiralizer, processor - anything to make healthy cooking easy? OR if they'd enjoy blueapron subscription for next year (or similar healthy food service)?

.

 

 

Edited by RoseRed135
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My girls swear by their one-pots....even DS has one in his barracks room (he has an efficiency kitchen). They got me one for my birthday weeks and weeks ago, but I haven't tried it yet. They come in several sizes and do so many things...Combo pressure cooker/crockpot that even makes cheesecake. Most things are 30 minutes or less

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1 hour ago, ImpishMom said:

Here's the thing: I don't know about the US, but *here*, Drs are pushed for time. They have a LOT of ppl to see in a day, and many, MANY areas have a shortage of general practitioners. I drive over 2 hrs one way (or rather, Wolf does) to see our GP, b/c there's waiting lists for those local to us. We hit walk in clinics if need be, in btwn.

When, exactly, would you like Drs to provide these educational seminars? Here, Drs can (and will) tell a patient that they're obese, briefly outline the health issues, and offer to make a referral to a nutritionist. It's on the patient to follow through. 

Frankly, I think the idea of denying someone non emergent medical care due to a pre-existing condition is both repugnant, and a slippery slope. If you're going to say that those who are obese don't deserve non-emergent care, then that goes for all people with addictions, right? Alcoholics, narcotics, hoarders...can't choose just one. Then, what about other mental illnesses that have an impact on physical health? Well, ditch them til they're compliant with treatment!

Access to health care shouldn't be used as a carrot/stick.

Since this thread is also designated to taste/preference, I "felt" loved when treated in Canada, "felt" like a person, not an appointment- I adored the modest facilities- The focus was the patient, their will being, and not the facility- That was the late 70's, early 80's- Pediatric care? Incredibly personal, compassionate, supportive and instructional- Not rushed- I loved it- I guess I should doubt it's still the same?

Quite a departure from the then 2/3 story open atrium in Miami with its waterfalls and leather and chrome seating, bromeliads and pothos, terzazzo floors and windows that reached the ceilings- No idea what it looks like now? Maybe a miniature city, shopping mall, international food court with a main concourse laden with Chihuly glass and expensive pieces of art-

But! They, as in some doctors, actually think withholding treatment is the treatment obese patients should receive- Gross ..

A doctor with that attitude shouldn't be allowed to hold a license to practice-

Perhaps doctors solely interested in obesity should form close-knit group practices that treat their patients with kindness and yet earn a reputation for treating obesity aggressively-

I don't blame the medical community for obesity- I do hold them accountable for their lack of interest-

 

 

 

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1 minute ago, Komorebi said:

Perhaps doctors solely interested in obesity should form close-knit group practices that treat their patients with kindness and yet earn a reputation for treating obesity aggressively-

I don't blame the medical community for obesity- I do hold them accountable for their lack of interest-

Again, I don't know where you get your information. You can't treat anything aggressively without patient consent. 

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27 minutes ago, Mame925 said:

Again, I don't know where you get your information. You can't treat anything aggressively without patient consent. 

Not solely from personal experience ..

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2 hours ago, Mame925 said:

You can't treat anything aggressively without patient consent. 

This is the crux of why your argument doesn't work! 

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