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SueSTx

The pros and cons of UHC

30 posts in this topic

Interesting! Thanks for the info, Julia!

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My experience with NHS vs Insurance system in the USA is that both want to cut corners and save money. The difference though is that insurance companies will do whatever it takes to make money because that is their business, whereas in the NHS its trying to save money and either way the patients get compromised.  The quality of care on the NHS depends on where you live and we had to go and see the gp that was assigned to us, so you live in a poor area or council estates you don't necessarily get a great gp office. Sometimes with the NHS it was like pulling teeth to get to see a specialist or get tests, whereas in the USA they are throwing tests at you left right and center and I had to learn to ask the right questions and challenge why I needed it.   With the NHS you are not facing economic disaster like in the USA.   I also hated that coverage  in the USA was dependent on employers and lack of preexisting conditions.  The plus side with the NHS was that you could always pay  extra to see specialist if really felt it was needed or get insurance, but given the cost of contributing to NHS, adding health insurance is a prohibitive to most working folk.

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I think the difference between the US and other countries that have their act together is that in the US everything is a pursuit where in other countries it is provided- From birth, to old age-

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On ‎2017‎-‎11‎-‎19 at 2:25 PM, skipped said:

Sue you mentioned there was no free ride.  I always knew that countries with universal health care had to pay for it somehow, but I never bothered to google how.  So I just did and found this

In 2016, the average unattached (single) individual, earning an average income of $42,914, will pay approximately $4,257 for pub- lic health care insurance. An average Canadian family consisting of two adults and two chil- dren (earning approximately $122,101) will pay about $11,494 for public health care insurance.

This doesn't seem that different to me than the current system in place under Obamacare.

Except in the USA you can refuse to enroll and pay a penalty  This is my main objection to it- you are enabling people to be irresponsible, and cry whose me, help me out anyway, when they refuse to pay WHAT THEY CAN, to the system  And yes I know this is a republican idea. 

Am I missing something?

I'm not sure where you found your stats for Canadian families and the amount you posted, but I can tell you, at no point in time in our lives, including when we had 5 little ones toddling around in 4-corner pants, did we ever pay more than a few hundred dollars a year for Medical/Health Insurance. 

Granted, DH, had Medical/Health Benefits paid for by his employer, which of course saves people a BUNDLE, however, since retiring, our Medical/Health Insurance Premium sits at $2300 (per year) respectively, and may I add, Premiums are not gauged on past income earnings.

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To add... the average Premium cost for a retired Canadian family sits at around $2600 - $2800 (per year) respectively.

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