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Komorebi

Net Neutrality

5 posts in this topic

I've watched several informative videos and read several articles on the new net neutrality rules and can't say I understand it -- completely- But I've a technical question perhaps someone who understands net neutrality can answer- On Roku, the Netflix channel user interface automatically plays a trailer as you scroll through the movies- It isn't a feature that can be turned off -- I already called Netflix to inquire- (twice..) My question is, do these trailers use up bandwidth and if so after new net neutrality rules go into effect will Netflix customers have to pay for the bandwidth their customers are forced to use? Anyone know? The YouTube channel on Roku just updated it's user interface, too- And as you scroll through the videos they automatically play a loop or GIF of each video -- don't know what to call it-

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I honestly don’t understand what it is.

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Here's a simple definition found by googling "net neutrality meaning...

Dictionary
net neu·tral·i·ty
noun
noun: net neutrality;
  1. the principle that Internet service providers should enable access to all content and applications regardless of the source, and without favoring or blocking particular products or websites.

... but I don't think it answers your question, Komo.

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But maybe this paragraph will help, from the article "Net neutrality is dead: What now?" on engadget.com. Though the articles talks about some companies possibly having to pay more money, it suggests that consumers have non-financial concerns at stake:

But for consumers, the effects of today's FCC vote transcend financial matters. This is about equality, giving every person the same foundation from which to launch their businesses, enjoy their hobbies and consume entertainment. Charging more for faster speeds or certain services undercuts the foundation of a free and open internet. This is why advocacy groups like the ACLU and EFF are so fervidly for Title II net neutrality regulations. In an age of #influencers, YouTube stars and Instagram divas, everyone deserves the same shot at going viral. It's the American dream for the digital age, and the FCC just crushed it.

.
Edited by RoseRed135

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This article, "Ending net neutrality will save the Internet, not destroy it," from foxnews.com takes a different view, however, as shown in this paragraph:

By ending net neutrality, the Trump administration’s Restoring Internet Freedom Order gets government out of the business of telling ISPs how to run their networks. This puts consumers and private businesses back in charge of how the internet operates.

As for the financial side of the issue, this article, also speaks only about ISPs (Internet service providers) and companies, such as Netflix and YouTube. It doesn't say anything about higher costs being passed onto their customers.
 
Therefore, a content provider – especially companies like Netflix and YouTube – may wish to pay a little bit extra to a network company to guarantee better quality for its customers. Further, because YouTube, Netflix and other internet video streaming businesses consume lots of data compared to almost all others going online, it might make sense for Verizon and other ISPs to ask such businesses to pay a little more for their services.
 
But who knows? Maybe whether or not the ordinary person will have to pay for these changes hasn't been decided yet..

 

 

 

 

r

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